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What You Need to Start Hanging Stuff on the Wall—Before Your Room Becomes a Landfill

Illustration for article titled What You Need to Start Hanging Stuff on the Wall—Before Your Room Becomes a Landfill
Photo: Loren Gu

I live and work in a small bedroom. My bed, office desk, consoles, and other stuff are all in this 200 square foot or so space. It’s a bit of a tight fit! But I also get my own bathroom and for relatively cheap rent in my area, so I can’t complain. It’s good to downsize every once and a while. Since moving, however, I’ve realized I need to stop leaving the things I use every day on the ground. I mean, it wasn’t a good idea even when I had room (I’ve stepped on important things way too many times), but it’s even worse when I have NO room. So the next best thing? Hanging stuff up on the wall.

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Why Hang Stuff Up?

Illustration for article titled What You Need to Start Hanging Stuff on the Wall—Before Your Room Becomes a Landfill
Photo: Elizabeth Henges

If you don’t have a lot of floor space, it only makes sense to utilize your wall space. The most obvious examples of this are shelves, of course, but there are other ways to take advantage of a blank part of your walls and hang up things you use often for easy access. Plus, these items can double as some decor for your room. I’ve gotten compliments on how my controllers are displayed on the wall behind my webcam. I mean, I call those people filthy gamers afterward, but it’s definitely better looking that a blank wall, and the controllers stay out of my way while remaining accessible when I need them.

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Hanging stuff up on hooks has done wonders for me … well, not losing my wallet and keys. My wallet, keys, masks, and purse all have hooks right next to the door to grab them, so it’s hard to forget them when it’s time to go out. I’ve lost my keys and wallets on so many occasions in my room, it’s kind of silly why I never did it in the first place.

So how do you take advantage of those bare walls to get stuff off the ground? What do you need? I have you covered below.

Command Hooks Can Be Your Friend ...

Illustration for article titled What You Need to Start Hanging Stuff on the Wall—Before Your Room Becomes a Landfill
Graphic: Elizabeth Henges

Probably the most well-known brand of “hanging things on walls”, Command Hooks are a good place to start if you’re looking for something to hang individual items on. They come in a variety of sizes for whatever you need, as well as various styles depending on the room you’re hanging them in. Need something to get the boom and mop out of the corner? Or maybe something that you can hang your bathroom towels on without putting holes everywhere? There’s a Command Hook for that.

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... but They Can Also Be Your Enemy

Illustration for article titled What You Need to Start Hanging Stuff on the Wall—Before Your Room Becomes a Landfill
Photo: Elizabeth Henges
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The adhesive Command Hooks use to stick to your wall can sometimes work too well. Before you start sticking them up everywhere, take one of the strips and place it in an inconspicuous place in the room (near the floorboards or in a dark corner). Let the strip sit for a day then pull it off. You’ll be able to see if the adhesive strips the paint with it this way. It’s definitely best to do this before setting the hooks up! Let’s just say I didn’t, and when I needed to move one of my hooks slightly and the paint came with it, I knew I wasn’t getting my security deposit back.

Some Problems Demand Tailored Solutions

Illustration for article titled What You Need to Start Hanging Stuff on the Wall—Before Your Room Becomes a Landfill
Photo: Elizabeth Henges
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Despite the variety of Command Hooks available, though, there’s not quite a Command Hook for everything. For my controllers and headsets, I needed to look elsewhere. eLHook’s controller hangers hold my PlayStation 4 and Switch Pro controllers perfectly, with no risk of them falling. These also use Command strips to keep themselves up so be careful, but a thrifty person can find a replacement. In for a penny, in for a pound—I just used the command strips.

For my headsets, I used these Oaspire headphone hooks, which also have been working great. The hooks came with mini cable clips for the wires, but they never stuck on the wall, so I just wrap the cable around the microphone and hang it as is. The hooks worked wonderfully, and even hold my Xbox One controller well, which didn’t quite fit on the controller hangers correctly.

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Location, Location, Location

Illustration for article titled What You Need to Start Hanging Stuff on the Wall—Before Your Room Becomes a Landfill
Photo: Elizabeth Henges
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Putting things up on your wall is all well and good, but if you put those hooks and hangers in a bad place, then you’re not going to use them. I originally had both my PlayStation 4 and PC headsets next to each other behind my entertainment center. But, I used the PC headset so often and my computer is on the other end of the room, so more often than not it ended up on my tiny desk or on the floor. After buying another set of hangers and sticking one right next to my desk, the headset is always within arm’s reach and easy to put away when I’m done with it!

Shelf the Mess for Later

Illustration for article titled What You Need to Start Hanging Stuff on the Wall—Before Your Room Becomes a Landfill
Graphic: Elizabeth Henges
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I mean, if you’re hanging stuff on the wall, shelves are a no brainer should your leasing agreement permit. Because some landlords prefer that you not drill holes in their walls, you’ll need to be careful, or prepare to do some patchwork so they don’t notice. Some shelves you can stick on a wall just like the hooks, like these meant to hold small electronics. But, obviously, you can’t topple them with anything heavy or bound to slip off. If you need shelving for books or something a little heavier, be ready to make a few holes.


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